Communal Confession anti-Asian Racism

Invitation to Solidarity
Since the pandemic started in early 2020, there have been more than 3,000 reported incidents of anti-Asian racism, according to Stop AAPI Hate, an initiative that tracks violence and harassment among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. In January 2021 these violent attacks targeted the elderly. An 84-year-old Thai man was shoved to the ground as he was taking his morning walk in San Francisco. In the neighboring city of Oakland, a 91-year-old man was pushed down, which caused him to fall face first into the pavement. For a community whose elders are deeply respected and looked up to as the source of communal and filial unity and wisdom, this hits hard.

Communal Confession
Asian siblings are hurting. How do we, the church, hear their painful cry, and act together in solidarity? We pray …
Lord, have mercy.
Are Asians invisible? They are branded as the model minority — therefore, not expected to speak up. They cry for justice. Can anyone hear them? We pray …
Lord, have mercy.
Asians are feared as a community. Asians have complex cultures and languages, so they are generally omitted. How can we, the church, offer our curiosity and respect when we encounter a multitude of gifts in diversity and uniqueness? We pray …
Lord, have mercy.
Asian children are called many names, most recently “coronavirus,” or yelled at to “go home.” When we, the church, ask, “Who is our neighbor?,” how can we truly mean it in welcoming words and actions? We pray …
Lord, have mercy.
Asians are used by the mainstream dominant culture to shame and put a wedge against other communities of color. Claiming our calling that all are created in God’s image, how can we stand in solidarity with those hurting?
We pray …
Lord, have mercy.
God’s forgiveness is greater than any hurt and pain of the body. For Asian theologies, forgiveness is an invitation to examine and reexamine what constitutes our identity, not only our individual identity but, most especially, our communal identity. May God’s forgiveness invite us all to face who we are truly as members of the body of Christ. May this rich promise embrace us all, taking away the pain of our battered body. Amen.